Tramping in the Kaweka & Kaimanawa Forest Parks, New Zealand

I recently accompanied Emma’s father (Stewart), his friend (David), and David’s avian aversion certified Labrador (Sika) on a four day/three night tramp (AKA ‘hike’ for those not familiar with the New Zealand lingo).

Click on any of the photos in this post to get a closer look.

Ngaawapurua hut, Kaweka and Kaimanawa Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018
Myself, Stewart, Sika and David outside Ngaawapurua Hut
Man and His Dog, Kaweka Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018
David and Sika

Note: Only registered, avian aversion certified hunting dogs, Guide dogs and dogs used for special services (including conservation management activities) are permitted in Kaweka and Kaimanawa Forest Parks. All other dogs are banned.


Getting There

We were dropped into the Kaweka Forest Park via helicopter before setting off. This helicopter trip was a birthday present from Emma’s parents. (Thanks so much, guys!)

Harkness Hut and Helisika, Kaweka Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018
Arriving in the Kaweka Ranges by helicopter

We spent our time straddling the Kaweka and Kaimanawa ranges exploring . We were spoilt when it came to the scenery, wildlife, weather and accommodation.

Consulting the Map, Kaweka Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018
David, Stewart and Sika consulting the map
Beech Forest and Streams Kaweka Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018
Following a stream through the beech forest
River Crossings, Kaweka and Kaimanawa Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018
Stewart, David and Sika crossing a river
Forest Stream Crossings (3), Kaweka Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018
Followed by me

Accommodation

The three Department of Conservation huts we stayed in were; Harkness, Oamaru and Boyd. On our final day, we walked out and back to Helisika base, the location from which we first took off from.

Harkness Hut (2), Kaweka Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018
Inside Harkness Hut

Click to zoom in


Kaweka & Kaimanawa Forest Parks

The Kaweka & Kaimanawa Forest Parks have alpine shrublands, tussock valleys and beech forests. Both forest parks have rafting, canoeing, hunting and fishing, hot springs and tramping for experienced trampers and day walkers. Department of Conservation brochures for both Kaweka & Kaimanawa are available.

Click to zoom in

Click to zoom in

Click to zoom in


Flora and Fauna

A highlight for me, as always, was being immersed in the different habitats throughout the trip whilst keeping my eyes and ears open in search of wildlife encounters. Here are a few of the organisms we saw.

If you can help us identify any of the species further, we’d love to know your thoughts.


Birds

Click to zoom in


Insects

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Arachnids

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Other Invertebrates

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Special mention: A velvet worm (Peripatus sp.) capturing a mite

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Fungi, Lichens & Slime Molds

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Flora

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A fantastic trip had by all

We had a great time exploring the forest parks, and I’d definitely recommend paying a visit for yourself. If anyone has any questions about the area, feel free to ask!

Forest Stream Crossings, Kaweka Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018
David and Sika

Sika taking a much deserved nap after all of that exploring!

Sunrise at Boyd (2), Kaweka and Kaimanawa Forest Park, New Zealand 20-01-2018


References and Further Reading

Department of Conservation Website – Kaimanawa Forest Park – http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/places-to-go/central-north-island/places/kaimanawa-forest-park/
(Retrieved 12 February, 2018)

Department of Conservation Website – Kaweka Forest Park –http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/places-to-go/hawkes-bay/places/kaweka-forest-park/
(Retrieved 12 February, 2018)

Department of Conservation Website – Dog Training – http://www.doc.govt.nz/dogtraining
(Retrieved 12 February, 2018)

16 Comments Add yours

  1. blhphotoblog says:

    Looks like you had a fantastic time, not many butterflies? regards Brian

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Brian,
      I certainly did. It was a great experience. No, you’re right, I didn’t actually come across that many butterfly species. I’ll have to keep my eyes peeled for more next time!
      Tom

      Liked by 1 person

      1. blhphotoblog says:

        And don’t forget the photographs! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Fotohabitate says:

    It’s a wonderful place. Thanks for showing.
    But I have a wish: Unfortunately your website needs plenty of time loading with much breaks. 😦 It’s because the pictures are in full size. It would be better to crop them. Normally 960 px or 1.200 px are enough. I think that will help! Thank you!
    Have a nice time! Simone

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your feedback, Simone! 🌿 We shall definitely work on making the site faster. Is it this post in particular that is slow? Or, is it the whole website?

      To our other readers: We’d appreciate your feedback, too. 🌞 Is anyone else finding the site slow to load?

      Many thanks!
      Emma

      Like

      1. blhphotoblog says:

        Took me a while to learn to navigate around your site but there is a lot of content, no probs with loading speeds.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thanks for your feedback, Brian! It’s greatly appreciated.

        -Emma

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Fotohabitate says:

        Hi Emma, It’s very slowly when I read your posts with many pictures in the WP-Reader (Smartphone). That do not happen when I open other post which has also pictures. So I think it depends on the big size
        of the pictures and perhaps on my WLAN connection. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Thanks once again for your feedback, Simone! It’s a great help! 🙂

        -Emma

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Wendy says:

    Fantastic photos. Thanks for sharing. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much, Wendy!

      -Emma

      Like

  4. My repeated experience here in the United States, and twice recently in Canada, is that many dog owners pay no attention to signs saying dogs aren’t allowed in a certain place. If I politely point out that dogs aren’t allowed, those people often ignore me, sometimes get hostile, and occasionally even threaten me. Do dog owners in New Zealand generally comply with the restrictions?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Steve! Unfortunately, that sounds pretty much the same as here in NZ. Nobody likes to think that their friendly, family pooch would even hurt a fly. But all it takes is one over exuberant dog not on a leash to do some serious damage! Case in point: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/6424474/Kiwi-deaths-spur-reminder-to-dog-owners 😦

      -Emma

      Like

      1. Oh, I’m sorry to hear that it’s as bad over there as it is over here. I’ve sometimes thought that the proper punishment for a dog owner found guilty of letting a dog run loose is to put the owner on a leash for a month or two.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. The larger photo of the morepork has to be the cutest shot of a morepork I’ve ever seen. Well spotted, and well taken! And the velvet worm is so pretty! I adored all of the photos actually 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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